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INTRODUCTION

CONCRETE CLOTH (only avalable in the US)

Concrete Cloth Geosynthetic Cementitious Composite Mats (GCCM) are a groundbreaking material technology that makes it possible to use concrete on slopes, in water, and in other hard-to-reach locations, without forms or mixing and minimal equipment requirements. An engineered concrete in roll form, Concrete Cloth GCCM is fabricated with a three-dimensional structure that reinforces the concrete, providing strength and durability. Concrete Cloth GCCM can be quickly cut and secured in place, making it ideal for reinforcing or rehabilitating a culvert or drainage ditch, abutment, berm or other structure. Once hydrated, the cloth cures quickly to form a rigid, durable and water-resistant 5,000 psi armor. The cloth remains flexible for up to two hours and is easily manipulated to fit the contours of irregular installations.

Unlike regular concrete, Concrete Cloth materials can be installed in the rain and other wet conditions, virtually eliminating rescheduling due to weather conditions.

The material is available in a three thicknesses: CC5- 5 mm, CC8- 8 mm, and CC13- 13 mm, and in two formats (roll sizes): bulk rolls or small man-poHtable batch rolls. The quantity per roll differs between the thicknesses, which can be found on the data sheet. All three thicknesses are available in bulk rolls.

Concrete Cloth material has a low alkaline reserve and a low wash rate for a minimal ecological impact. The unique structure of Concrete Cloth material facilitates ease of installation. The fabric can be hung vertically, laid in trenches, or cut and formed into shapes to create a durable layer of concrete, making it ideal for a variety of applications, including:

  • Ditch lining
  • Erosion control and slope protection
  • Berm protection
  • Culvert lining

GALLERY

SPECIFICATIONS & MSDS

BROCHURES & WHITE PAPERS

INSTALLATION & DESIGN

BOULDER CONCRETE CLOTH EROSION REPAIR

After a period of heavy rainfall, a Boulder, Colorado, homeowner discovered severe erosion in his backyard at the end of his leach field (also known as a septic drain field). He had to find a way to repair this damage and stop it from happening again; nearly half of his lawn had dropped three…